Shopping Cart
Your shopping cart is empty!

New Improved Revolutionary Cool Heat Horse Rugs

New Improved Revolutionary Cool Heat Horse Rugs
New Improved Revolutionary Cool Heat Horse Rugs New Improved Revolutionary Cool Heat Horse Rugs New Improved Revolutionary Cool Heat Horse Rugs New Improved Revolutionary Cool Heat Horse Rugs
Product Code: cool-heat-rugs
Price: $220.00

Available Options


* Size:

Qty:  

About/Advantages

  • The Cool Heat Rug is not only a winter turnout rug; it offers many other unique advantages.
  • The Cool Heat lifts the blanket / rug 12mm or half an inch up off the horses body which allows the hair follicles to function as nature intended benefiting the long term health of the horse.
  • Your horse can effectively regulate its own body temperature preventing overheating and chills caused by fluctuating weather conditions.  Can be used during and after competition allowing your horse to safely cool down.
  • After competition or hard training session your horse can be washed down, rugged and turned out because your horses hair can effectively lift any moisture up off the skin with its natural wicking action which helps prevent chills and skin conditions.
  • Allows air to circulate over the entire body. This leads to healthier skin and a reduction in rubbing and hair loss due to itching resulting in a higher level of comfort for your horse.
  • No more hassles of the time consuming practice of putting on and taking off multiple rugs.  If you are caught with a rug on your horse when the day unexpectedly warms up, your horse is allowed to sweat freely under the Cool Heat, aiding the cooling process.
  • You can effectively rug a wet, muddy horse because the mud will dry and dissipate under the rug without chilling your horse
  • your horse will have a healthy clean coat so will be less likely to want to rip its rug off saving you a lot of expense repairing rugs

Piloerection

Piloerection is an important function in the process of thermal regulation. It is the horse's ability to speed up heat loss from the body or increase heat retention using their hair follicles. Each individual hair follicle has a small muscle fibre attached to its base called the "arrector pili" and to dermal tissue on the other end. When the horse feels its body cooling in colder weather the arrector pili contract all at once and the hair follicles stand erect. As the heat is dissipating from the body it has to flow through these upright hair follicles which dramatically slows down heat loss and it also helps retain the body heat against the skin, assisting to keep the animal warm.

On the other hand when the horse exercises or the day starts to warm up the "arrector pili" muscles relax and the hair follicles lie down allowing the horses body heat to quickly dissipate. This action allows the inner core body heat to quickly escape the body aiding the cooling process.

The problem with traditional rugging is that the hair follicles are constantly flattened. When the horse starts to feel cold it cannot raise its hair follicles to slow down its body heat loss. The body heat goes straight out through the blanket so the horse owner then goes the next step and double rugs which is OK while the horse is standing still. This results in many problems when the horse starts to exercise. These problems are covered on the Cool Heat blanket page.

As we know with any muscles they have to be continually active or otherwise atrophy occurs (muscle wastage). If a human breaks their leg and is put in a plaster cast for six weeks, when the plaster is removed, the leg muscles have wasted away and intensive physiotherapy is required to restore these muscles to their original healthy condition.

It is exactly the same situation for the "arrector pili" muscles which are continually flattened with long term rugging. Eventually the horse loses its natural ability to keep warm by raising and lowering its hair follicles. The horse then depends on constant rugging to keep warm in the cooler months. This atrophy to the arrector pili muscles also affects the horse's ability to protect itself in the rain. It can no longer wick moisture up off its skin by raising and lowering its hair follicles. The horse also loses its ability to lift sweat and condensation up off its skin, leading to overheating and skin conditions in the warmer weather.

The Cool Heat blanket allows the hair follicles to function as nature intended, benefiting the long term health of the horse.

For further reading refer to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piloerection

Thermal Regulation

A horse's body temperature has to be maintained at approximately 38 degrees Celsius for maximum health to be maintained. If this temperature is not regularly maintained health issues occur. For instance if the inner core body temperature rises above 38 degC, then the body can suffer heat stress and cell damage can occur to the vital organs. If the temperature drops below 38 degC, then chills and similar complications result. So, for optimum health to be maintained a horse has been provided by nature a number of body functions known as "thermal regulation". Whether running wild in the snow of the mountains or the heat of the desert a horse can maintain this temperature safely through the many variances of its thermal regulation abilities. These processes are listed below.

Piloerection, which has been described in detail above, is one of these functions.

Another very important function for thermal regulation is the horse's ability to regulate blood flow from the body's inner core to just under the skin's surface. The horse's blood naturally travels from deep inside the body through arteries and then into dilated blood vessels just below the skin's surface where it is effectively cooled before returning deep inside the inner core of the body. The opposite occurs when the horse is feeling cold. When the horse feels its body temperature starting to drop in cool weather it can constrict these blood vessels just under the skin's surface. As this blood travels from deep inside the body it is prevented from reaching the surface and cooling.

Muscle movement is a vital part of warming the body creating inner core body heat. This is achieved through body movement (exercise) or the act of shivering. Shivering is achieved through rapid muscle contraction and de-contraction near the skin's surface. Shivering is often involuntary but this rapid muscle movement generates considerable body heat. This should not be looked upon as the horse necessarily suffering from the cold but enacting a vital part of its thermal regulation process. A horse locked in a stable cannot walk or run around to create muscle movement, and hence body heat, so they rely on shivering to create body heat naturally. A horse in a yard or paddock will run or walk around depending on the amount of inner core body heat required to feel comfortable. In cold weather it is always best to avoid locking horses away in confined spaces. The opposite occurs in warm weather when horses restrict their body movement to a minimum to help reduce muscle movement which in turn reduces inner core body heat.

All these wonderful natural functions are impeded by rugging our horses, so if you need to rug, then rug with a Cool Heat blanket.

Watch David Macdonald demonstrate the cool horse blanket on ABC's The New Inventors! Click here to watch now

Difference between traditional horse rugs and the Macs Equine Cool Heat Rug

The Cool Heat blanket / rug has rows of soft plastic insulators which run the length of the blanket lifting the blanket 12mm or 1/2″ up off the hair of the horse. This prevents the flattening of the horse's hair protecting one of the horse's natural warming and cooling procedures, known as Piloerection, which is a vital part of a horse's thermal regulation process.

Disadvantages of long term use of traditional rugs / blankets

As we know with any muscles, they have to be continually active or otherwise atrophy occurs (muscle wastage).

If a person breaks their leg and is put in a plaster cast for six weeks, when the plaster is removed, the legs muscles have wasted away and intensive physiotherapy is required to restore the leg muscles to their original healthy condition. It is exactly the same situation for the "arrector pili" muscles which are continually flattened so eventually, with long term rugging, the horse loses its natural ability to keep warm by raising and lowering its hair follicles. The horse then depends on constant rugging to keep warm in the cooler months.

This atrophy to the arrector pili muscles also affects the horse's ability to protect itself in the rain as it can no longer wick moisture up off its skin through raising and lowering its hair follicles. The horse also loses its ability to lift sweat and condensation up off its skin, leading to overheating and skin conditions in warmer weather.

Sizing Chart

Please use the following sizing chart for determining which sized horse rug is most appropriate for you: The  following sizes are what are available unless sold out

 

Size in inches 63" 66" 69" 72" 75" 78" 81"
Size in feet and inches 5'3" 5'6" 5'9" 6'0" 6'3" 6'6"

6'9"

  

The following steps describe how to measure your horse to find the correct size Cool Heat rug/blanket:

Step 1

Start your measurement from the very middle of the horse's chest directly, under the middle of the neck. Starting at this point, pass your measuring tape across to your horse's shoulder, then around the shoulder and all the way along past your horses belly/side of your horse, finishing at the end of the horse's rump. Imagine your horse is standing with its backside firmly up against a wall and your measuring tape should reach to the wall. This is the end point of your measurement

Step 2

Now look at the size chart above and using your measurement , select your correct size rug  . If you are experienced around horses you will know what size rug your horse requires. If you are new to owning a horse and are measuring for a rug for the first time and are not confident with your measuring please email us with any questions you may have and we can help you get the correct size

Step 3

When you are fitting your selected rug/blanket on your horse, ensure the straps are secured correctly and, for safety reasons, secure them in the following order. (When removing your rug/blanket follow the reverse order)

Secure the chest straps at the front of the rug/blanket

Secure the belly straps, ensuring they are not too tight. It is important that you can comfortably place a clenched fist between the straps and the belly

Secure the leg straps loosely around the horse's legs, passing the second secured strap through the first secured strap. It is important that the straps do not hang over or below the horse's hock when secured

Testimonials

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Write a review

Your Name:


Your Review: Note: HTML is not translated!

Rating: Bad           Good

Enter the code in the box below: